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Research: My research interests include rhetorical theory and criticism, rhetoric of documentary films, national identity studies, and the history of women in labor issues and movements in America. My ongoing research includes early 20th century representations of indigenous cultures and their effects on American national identity. Other current work considers the rhetorical function of genre characteristics in advocacy documentary as essential for the genre to remain persuasive and effective and a recent new adventure into the history and current gender politics of the International Workers of the World.

When I am not working you can find me binge watching films either on Netflix or in a movie theater ( I like to think of it as research) or trying to figure out how Twitter works.

ncsu.academia.edu/ChandraHolstMaldonado

Chandra Maldonado

Learning about the archive

2 min read

 In light of Eddie’s post on archival research this past week, I thought I would do some more digging to find ways, if any, of how archives are being used in the classroom. I have not been an undergraduate student for some time now and picked up the taste for archival work in my graduate studies so I can imagine what life would have been like if an instructor would have introduced me to archival research early on in my education.   The link to the article below is a study conducted by an instructor of an undergraduate World Literature class. The author expresses that using the archive in the classroom will help contextualize and enrich the student’s experience on the topic they are researching. The author also claims that experience with these types of materials will help the student to tackle advanced projects in the future. The author notes “Experts emphasize that such tasks help build students’ information literacy, internal authority, recognition of the contingent nature of primary sources, and ability to process multiple diverging perspectives. Building these skills early increases undergraduates’ capacities to absorb and critically analyze information, while also increasing the likelihood that they will pursue advanced research projects later in their college careers” (pg. 2).

 

 I am not sure if this is a published piece, as I can only find the word doc. when I searched, but the ideas seem to be spot on in terms of what we are exploring is class.  I have the document if anyone once to read it or it is easily googled. 

 

http://ariel.synergiesprairies.ca/ariel/index.php/ariel/article/view/4923

On  another note: Does anyone know how to attach word documents in a post?

Chandra Maldonado

Classroom Assessment and Technology

1 min read

 

This is an interesting article on the ways that technology use can help the instructor make classroom assessments. A study in the article suggests that that tracking simple activities like how many times a student opens a textbook will predict the student’s success in the classroom. Another example is a study that was done to predict success rates through studying the amount of time spent watching online lectures. Results showed that, not surprisingly, that the study of student time spent on online course material was a poor tool of measurement. The article also provides additional studies of assessment technology to track engagement and knowledge and skill with both promising and unpromising prediction results.

 

Helpful note: The article links to all the different assessment studies. 

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2015-07-13-3-ways-educational-technology-tools-predict-student-success

 

Chandra Maldonado

This might be a silly question but can we depend on the classroom population being the same every semester? If not, how can we vary our teaching tools/ strategies to allow for effective teaching every semester? Should we do course prep every semester to cater to the student even though it’s the same course?

Now for a platform question... What is the difference between status update and a post?

Chandra Maldonado

Lucas on communication

1 min read

This is a great video on the value of multi media literacy in communication studies. Lucas, not surprisingly, points out that art, cinema, etc. is not being used to their full potential because the medium is either seen as a privileged art form or not taken seriously.  Rather, he explains that such forms should be used as tools that can teach communication. An example of this could be the meaning behind color and design and how those elements are used in visual language.  I wanted to share this video because I am starting to see some of my colleagues incorporate the use of documentary films into their speech classes to help students identify speech structure. The video is also a reminder about my own relationship to certain technology mediums ( and fetishization of some).

 Isn’t George Lucas awesome?

 http://www.edutopia.org/george-lucas-teaching-communication-video

 

Chandra Maldonado

Relationship between analogue and digital and access to information

2 min read

https://www.hastac.org/blogs/hshaswell/2015/07/03/analogue-humanities

This blogger brought up a very interesting question about the future of the analogue archive and their own integrity as a researcher in this technology age:

 

 “So, what I’m wondering is, does that diminish the hard work I put into my research, because the resources I need are easily available to me digitally? Should I be sifting through a dusty old archive in search of that one piece of semi-vital information to legitimize my research, or is this it?” 

 While this has been an on-going conversation for some time now, I am wondering how digital documentation (or archiving) will help (as well as hurt) how we teach students about research and the importance of access to information (for all). We are still stuck between the use of analogue and digital, which means there are, still, a good number (a lot actually) of archives that are still not digitized and are extremely expensive to move to a digital platform.  If we do not have access to digital archives should we not encourage students to research the past anymore? How do we teach old archivists to navigate new digital filing systems?  How can we efficiently teach students how to research the past through technology platforms while encouraging students to go the extra mile if information isn’t assessable via a technology platform?

 The Internet Archive ( http://archive.org/index.php) is a great example of an open access platform for young (amateur) archival researchers who want to dig into the past.