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Eddie Lohmeyer is a Ph.D. student in the Communication, Rhetoric, and Digital Media program at North Carolina State University. He is currently exploring new ways in which a body interacts with and generates new sensory and perceptual experiences through digital video and sound from a Deleuzian perspective. To this end, his interests also comprise the study of affect experienced by a spectator when engaging with forms of digital cinema, gaming, remix culture, and new media art.

Eddie Lohmeyer

Connected Worlds Installation and New "Subjectivities"

2 min read

I saw this article on Wired.com not long ago and I immediately drew a connection to Wesch's notion of reinforcing a student's ability to become knowledge-able, particularly in terms of "subjectivities" or what he calls new ways of interacting with the world that might question students to adopt new worldviews and reevaluate old ones. Anyway, Connected Worlds is a large scale interactive exhibit at the New York Hall of Science that uses Microscoft Kinects and projection mapping to create an immersive, tactile environment for users to learn about various ecosystems and environmental science. Basically, when a participant touches or comes in proximity of certain areas, sensors will project new information in the form of interactive animations (i.e. a youngster can touch a certain part of the wall and a seed will begin to grow out of their hand...). Yes, the exhibit seems geared toward younger audiences but I think it brings up some interesting questions about how technology might organize the type of subjectivities Wesch mentions through new sensory experiences while overturning some of the traditional physical (the classroom has now become a lush, virtual environment) and cognitie (learning is engaged through visual-hapitical sensations-perceptions) structures that we have become accustomed to. 

http://www.wired.com/2015/08/key-digital-learning-bring-real-world/

Eddie Lohmeyer

Archive.org Resource

1 min read

I thought I would share the affordances of using archive.org as to add to our on-going resource pool. Basically, for those unfamiliar, archive.org is one, big gaint internet database of cultural artifacts in the form of archived webpages, texts, video, photographs, audio recordings, and older software. It is great for those teaching media theory/history classes simply because you can draw upon examples to show the class. It is also great for those who have taught or are going to teach production courses, especially if you want to appropriate "found" video or sound for a project. Videos can be downloaded as mp4s and audio as mp3s which is super convenient. I should add, it is also great for research too, especially if you are trying to track down visual evidence. 

Eddie Lohmeyer

Making and Production as a Means to Foster Inclusiveness?

2 min read

This is actually more of a springboard response to Melissa's post to the notion of "cultural responsiveness" because I see the act of being culturally responsive as bound to methods of inclusion too, particularly in the way an instructor creates a learning environment in which students of different ethnicities, race, religion, etc., might use creative expression as a means to bring cultural biases to the attention of classmates through their work. This works particularly well with audio/video production because students of different backgrounds can be urged to explore their own ethnic, religious, gender, diasporic identities through production. WIth teaching audio production, I've seen this to great success particularly with international students who would call another country home. I can remember at least one Turkish student who recreated a beautiful panoramic, ambient soundscape comprised of a collage of sounds that reminded her of her home and visiting family there over the years. The soundscape itself became an aural equvalent for her own cultural, diasporic identity as a Muslim woman living in the US. When she shared her project during a critiquing session, I defininately felt that there was more of a cultural awareness to perhaps the underlying anxieties (and excitement) or learning abroad as an international student. Anyway, food for thought.

Eddie Lohmeyer

Makey Makey Technology and Pedaogical Approaches to "Making"

1 min read

I'm sure most of you might have a basic idea of what Makey Makey is but I thought I'd at least share the "group activity guides" page in hopes that it might inspire some ideas for how to integrate this technology into the classroom. Makey Makey is essentially a super easy-to-use maker kit where one attaches alligator clips to various objects and turns them into basic controls for a number of applications found on the web. Several of us are also in Nick Taylor's game studies seminar and during today's class Nick used a Makey Makey kit to turn several bodies into "buttons" as a means to demonstrate some of the complexities regarding posthumanism, agency, and discursive-material practices that were discussed from the readings. Anyway, there are some really amazing things that are being done with Makey Makey in the classroom as a means to reconsider pedagogical practice through new sensory and perceptual experiences.

http://makeymakey.com/guides/