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Sarah Evans

Old technology can sometimes be the best

1 min read

My MA advisor (yay social networking as gateway to pedagogical tools!) posted this on Facebook last night and I couldn't help but immediately think of this class. This article advocates for using index cards at the end of class to ask students to reflect on the class and write one thing they learned that day and one thing they still had a question about. First, the emphasis on reflection resonates with my pedagogy, which highly values reflection as a way of engaging with material in class and connecting one's personal experience to it, when possible. Second, although the activity described in the article could be performed with Google Docs, I think this article demonstrates that modern technologies aren't necessary to enact good pedagogies; perhaps the conceptual work that goes into the creation of assignments is most important. 

http://thewritingcampus.com/2015/08/27/mini-and-mighty-how-the-one-minute-paper-can-transform-your-teaching/ (I'm not sure if this link is working correctly, if not, copy and paste old school style!)

Sarah Evans

DALN Archive.

1 min read

This is drawing from my past class in digital pedagogy but I figured it's pretty interesting and worthwhile to share. We talk a lot about ways we can use technologies in the classroom, but there are ways that technology can be used to create research as we use it to aide students' learning too. This project uses multimodal composition to "explore how people’s first-hand stories about reading and composing bring alive our scholarly understandings of those socially constructed [literacy[ narratives, as well as the complex cultural, political, ideological, and historical contexts which shape and are shaped by those practices and the values associated with them."  Link to the DALN: http://daln.osu.edu/ and a hub for research associated with it: http://ccdigitalpress.org/stories/daln1.html

 

Sarah Evans

U.S. government wants ANSWERS!

1 min read

The deadline is tommorow (today if we read this in class on 9/3) but if you have an idea for evaluating educational technology, the government wants YOUR help! This is a pretty interesting initiative because it shows that although we've been using various educational technologies in the classroom since pretty much forever, no one (especially the government) is even sure if they actually do anything better. Will the results of this in 2017 change the ways we implement tech in the classroom? Probably not! But it will be interesting to follow. https://www.edsurge.com/news/2015-08-24-the-government-wants-you-to-help-find-education-technology-tools-that-actually-work

 

Sarah Evans

Games for the people

1 min read

Games can be great for both comm and English classrooms because they offer the ability to facilitate interactive experiences in a relatively familiar form; everyone has played a game before. This is not to say that games are always the best choice, but you sure can do a lot with them.

For example, in English classrooms the tool Twine can be used to make/talk about hypertext stories. It's ridiculously easy to use and FREE! In the public speaking classroom, tabletop (therefore non-digital) games are my genre of preference because they facilitate face-to-face interactions that allow students to practice their public speaking skills in a lower risk, more playful situation. To also shamelessly self-promote, I'm linking the print-n-play version of a game I designed to help students practice using ethose, logos, and pathos. It's called Proof It!

If you are interested in incorporating games or game elements in your class, feel free to ask me about tools or games that I know of that might be relevent. And if we can't find anything, that's a perfect opportunity to fill the gap by designing a game yourself!